150 MEDIA STREAM

where artists, architects and technology
imagination, vision and creation
color, movement and light
collide, coalesce and catalyze

Our Mission

150 Media Stream is a multi-faceted achievement in art, architecture and technology that celebrates the transformational power of art as collective experience and explores the interplay of art, space and viewership in both public and private contexts.

During regularly scheduled “artists’ moments,” residents and visitors come together to experience media art displayed at a grand scale, as 89 LED blades stretching 150 feet long and rising 22 feet high ignite into light, color, and movement.

Developed in partnership with Chicago’s premier arts, culture and higher learning institutions and private supporters, the 150 Media Stream is an international platform for both rising and established Chicago, US and global media artists.

The installation also features competitively selected collaborative works by exceptional art educators and students through its groundbreaking media arts program, ensuring a truly representative cross-section of Chicago’s diverse arts community.

Located at 150 North Riverside Plaza in Chicago, the 150 Media Stream is the only structure of its kind dedicated to showcasing Chicago artists, culture and history alongside renowned and emerging artists from around the world.

Featured Artist

Jason Salavon, April 2017

Working around art, information technology, and daily life.

Using software processes of his own design, Jason Salavon generates and reconfigures masses of communal material to present new perspectives on the familiar. Though formally varied, his projects frequently manipulate the roles of individual elements arranged in diverse visual populations. This often unearths unexpected pattern as the relationship between the part and the whole, the individual and the group, is explored. Reflecting a natural attraction to popular culture and the day-to-day, his work regularly incorporates the use of common references and source material. The final compositions are exhibited as art objects, such as photographic prints and video installations, while others exist in a real-time software context.